Regular

Yesterday morning, I was at the Canadian Open Data Summit (CODS), where a lot of the discussion was around the benefits of open data for governance. Beth Blauer from Johns Hopkins discussed her experience working in various muncipalities in developing data infrastructure to support governance decisions. This led to the...

Jacques Rancière, Hatred of Democracy, Verso, 2009. From what I can tell, after reading just two of Rancière’s books, his political project is based on a radical egalitarianism that I’m not sure I’ve seen to urgently expressed anywhere else. In The Ignorant Schoolmaster, he argues for a recognition, or at...

In her presentation at yesterday’s session of Marx’s Capital after 150 Years, Ursula Huws ridiculed the idea that increased automation (e.g. robots) will (soon) replace all human workers. She bases her argument on Marx’s understanding of both the organic composition of capital and the temporary profitability gained from automation. The...

Tyler A. Shipley, Ottawa and Empire: Canada and the Military Coup in Honduras, Toronto: Between the Lines, 2017. (Disclosure: I’ve known Tyler since we were both in a Russian history seminar taught by Oleh Gerus at University of Manitoba, sometime in the late 1990s). NOTE: This is a pretty hot...

I first wrote about John Pateman around this time last year, responding to one of his Open Shelf columns about what Pateman understands as the “true community-led library” (an example of the No True Scotsman fallacy). As I said in “Public Libraries, History, and the State”, Pateman isn’t exactly wrong...